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Sound Beach

Recent Home Sales

  • Population
    10,182
  • Change from 1990
    12%
  • Population density
    4,136 per square mile
  • Median household income
    $70,853.0
  • Median age
    36 years
  • Married with children
    41% of households
  • Median age of dwellings
    35 years
  • Owner-occupied
    75% of homes
  • LIRR travel time to NYC
    96-117 minutes
  • Crime risk
    33 (100 = national average)

Buyers guide

  • High-end

    Price: $420,000-$600,000
    Specs: 3-5 BR, 2-3.5 BA
    Mix of Colonials, high-ranches, contemporaries
  • Trade-up

    Price: $290,000-$395,000
    Specs: 3-4 BR, 1.5-2.5 BA
    Mostly ranches and capes
  • Starter

    Price: $220,000-$280,000
    Specs: 2 BR, 1 BA
    Ranches
Source: Ed Stein, Century 21 Rustic Realty

Home Prices

  • Median price of single-family home in Sound Beach:

    2013 $224,650
    2012 $215,000
    2011 $225,000
    2010 $275,000
    2009 $256,000
    2008 $293,500

Community Profile

The North Shore hamlet of Sound Beach, which turns 75 next year, is noted for its bluffs and spectacular sunsets over its private beach.

Sound Beach is largely residential, with some houses of worship and a few small businesses at the intersection of Sound Beach Boulevard and New York Avenue, commonly called The Square.

Narrow, hilly roads meander through heavily wooded neighborhoods, where it seems that no two homes are alike. The lots are often small, with an array of home styles including cottages (some renovated), ranches, high-ranches, capes, Colonials and newer post- moderns.

"It isn't a tract development," says Bob Bedrossian, a longtime resident and owner of Bedrossian Real Estate. "About 95 percent of the homes are unique."

Sound Beach has an unusual history emerging from a New York City newspaper circulation war. In 1928, The Daily Mirror bought more than 1,000 acres in the area. A year later, the newspaper began selling 20-by-100- foot lots for $89.50 to buyers who took out a year's subscription.

The newspaper eventually folded, but the plan did attract adventurous souls from the city who would make the long trek to the country during the summer months. They cleared their land, pitched tents and eventually built bungalows.

About 95 percent of the population now live in Sound Beach year-round, Bedrossian said.

- Lisa Doll Bruno (11/7/2003)